We asked, you told us: Oppo Reno’s shark fin selfie camera is neat, but is a no-go

Oppo Reno Hands On shark fin popup camera

Urged on by customers, smartphone companies have done their best to eliminate screen bezel. While this has resulted in some introducing features such as notches, others such as Oppo, Samsung, and Vivo have introduced motorized pop-up cameras.

Each company has taken on the pop-up mechanism in its own but relatively similar fashion. Oppo Reno’s camera module, on the other hand, slides up at an angle. This shark fin design is unique and differentiates it from the competition.

So we decided to ask you, are you a fan of the Oppo Reno’s shark fin selfie camera? Here’s what you had to say.

Oppo Reno shark fin selfie camera

Results

Out of the roughly 23 thousand votes across the website, Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube, just over 50 percent were against the Oppo Reno’s shark fin camera and flash module. Similar to past polls, voters on the site were the only ones to differ from the rest of the pack as they voted for the unique design.

Looking through the comment section, it appears as those most aren’t actually against the shark fin design, but instead against motorized/moving pieces on smartphones. Just like what we’ve seen with the Samsung Galaxy Fold, pieces of debris can quickly get between moving parts and cause damage. Many fear that something similar would happen, causing the front-facing camera to no longer work.

Noteworthy comments

Here are some of the best comments from last week’s poll explaining why they voted the way that they did:

  • Wonder what happens the first time you drop it on the top edge while the camera is extended? The current mania for bezel free phones is ludicrous. It offer no real world benefit. So you get a couple of extra lines of text on a web page. So what? And all the compromises that end up being made to achieve that are creating phones that are less functional, not more.
  • I like the design, but had to vote nay because of no secure face unlock and no water resistance. I’ve gotten spoiled by no notch, no hole punch, better than average water resistance, stereo speakers, dual front cameras, and 3D face mapping.
  • I think it looks good, tho a hole punch is better because it doesn’t have compromises like water resistance
  • If durability isn’t a problem it’s much more preferable than a punch hole or water drop camera. However, we rarely use the selfie camera so we couldn’t care less if there is one at all. I’m guessing we may be in the minority in that sense. Although we don’t know anyone personally that does that every day or even every other day save for special occasions.
  • I can see dirt getting stuck in there or scratching it up maybe the leaver gets broken it gets pulled on
  • Why people hate things that are different? I think it looks cool lol I welcome all change

That’s it for this week, everyone. As always, thanks for voting, thanks for the comments, and don’t forget to let us know what you thought of the results below.

How to disable Bixby on your Galaxy S10 or earlier Galaxy phone

Get rid of the Galaxy’s most disappointing feature.

Ever since Samsung announced the Galaxy S8 with its onboard assistant, Bixby, people have been asking for ways to disable it and forget the button ever existed in the first place. With the Galaxy S9 and Note 9, that chorus became even louder, and with the Galaxy S10 now available, a whole new generation of customers will be looking to disable Bixby.

While the hardware button’s not going anywhere, we can definitely do something about the software. Here’s how to get rid of as much of Bixby as possible.

Why do you want to disable Bixby?

One of the biggest frustrations with the Bixby button is its placement; the button is right under the volume keys and nearly directly opposite the power buttons. On larger phones like the Galaxy S9+ and Note 8, this often leads to accidental presses and unintended Bixby launches, especially when double-pressing the power button to launch the camera.

The Bixby button is also not mappable to another action; Samsung wants you to use it for Bixby, or not at all. This isn’t ideal, so many people will inevitably choose to just forget it exists and move on.

What version do you have?

First, you need to determine which version of Android you have — Oreo or Pie. That will determine the steps you take for disabling Bixby.

If you’re running a Galaxy S8, Note 8, or S9 and haven’t updated to the new One UI, follow the steps for Android 8 Oreo.

If you’re running a Galaxy S8, Note 8, S9 or Note 9 and have updated to the new One UI, or you’re running a Galaxy S10, follow the steps for Android 9 Pie (One UI).

Android 9 Pie (One UI)

All Samsung phones running One UI are based on Android Pie, and they’ve been updated to Bixby 2.0. While the version introduces a bunch of new features, it also removes the ability to disable Bixby entirely, though there are still workarounds.

That’s because instead of allowing users to disable the Bixby button entirely, Bixby 2.0 lets you change the activation from a single tap to a double tap. That way you won’t accidentally activate Bixby every time you want to press the volume down button. Here’s how to do it.

Note: These steps apply to Note 9 users on Android Oreo, too.

Before you do anything, log into your Samsung account

Samsung is smart: in order to allow you to disable most aspects of Bixby, it forces you to log into your Samsung account. You were prompted to do this when you first signed into your phone, but if you decided to skip that step, you’re going to want to sign in — even if it’s just to disable Bixby.

  1. Press the Bixby button or swipe right on your phone’s home screen.
  2. Tap the next (arrow) button.
  3. Enter your Samsung account credentials or Create account.
    • If creating an account, enter details, agree to the terms, and verify account details through email.
  4. If prompted to “Use your biometrics”, tap Not now.
  5. Tap the next (arrow) button.

  6. Review the terms and conditions and tap the next (arrow) button.
  7. If desired, teach Bixby your voice and tap the next (arrow) button.
  8. Tap the next (arrow) button for the final time.

Now you’re logged into your Samsung account and are ready to start disabling Bixby!

How to remove Bixby Home from the home screen

Note: This works on all variants of the Galaxy with the Bixby button, including the Note 9 and S10.

The first step to disabling Bixby is to remove Bixby Home access from the home screen which, by default, puts it on the left-most panel.

  1. From the home screen, hold down on empty space until the menu appears.
  2. Swipe to the right to reach the left home panel.
  3. Disable Bixby Home.

How to disable the Bixby button

Now we’re getting to the important stuff. While you can’t completely disable the Bixby button in One UI, you can mostly disable it by relegating it to a double-press. Here’s how to do it!

  1. Open Settings.
  2. Tap Advanced Features.
  3. Tap Bixby key.
  4. Select Double press to open Bixby.

That’s it! While you can still use an app like bxActions to disable the button completely, at least Samsung is now offering an official way to make your life less painful on One UI. Yes, Bixby is still technically accessible by double-tapping the Bixby button, but that’s much less likely to happen accidentally than if it were stuck with a single press.

What if I want to remap the Bixby button to something else?

One UI no longer lets you disable Bixby entirely, which is a bummer. But a recent update, as of February 2019, lets you can remap that button to open any app you want… like the camera or even Google Assistant. The process is really easy and it actually works super well, so you won’t have to spend time hacking or downloading sketchy apps.

Follow the steps in the link below to get started!

How to remap the Bixby button on your Galaxy Phone to launch any app

Android 8 Oreo

On earlier versions of Android Oreo, Samsung let you completely disable Bixby in all forms, essentially removing it from your phone. If you’re still running that older version, follow the steps below.

Note: These steps won’t work for Galaxy Note 9 users on Android Oreo. Please follow the steps for Pie, as they’re the same.

Before you do anything, log into your Samsung account

Samsung is smart: in order to allow you to disable most aspects of Bixby, it forces you to log into your Samsung account. You were prompted to do this when you first signed into your phone, but if you decided to skip that step, you’re going to want to sign in — even if it’s just to disable Bixby.

  1. Press the Bixby button or swipe right on your phone’s home screen.
  2. Tap the next (arrow) button.
  3. Choose your Bixby Voice language and tap next.
  4. Tap Sign in.

  5. Enter your Samsung account credentials or Create account.
    • If creating an account, enter details, agree to the terms, and verify account details through email.

How to disable Bixby Voice

Bixby is divided into two distinct categories: Bixby Voice and Bixby Home. Voice is the feature that lets you get stuff done by holding down the Bixby button for a moment, walkie-talkie-style. It’s useful but can get frustrating when it doesn’t work, so you’re going to want to turn it off before you disable Bixby Home (which is accessed by short-pressing the Bixby button).

  1. While on the Samsung home screen, swipe right until you get to Bixby Home.

    • Alternatively, press the Bixby button on the left side of the phone, right under the volume rocker.

  2. On the top menu bar, tap the three vertical dots.
  3. Tap Settings.
  4. Uncheck Bixby Voice.

That’s it! Now Bixby Voice won’t bug you when you accidentally hold down your finger on the Bixby button. Next, we have to prevent the Bixby button from accessing Bixby Home.

How to disable the Bixby button

Now that Bixby Voice has been disabled, we have to disable Bixby Home from popping up whenever we accidentally press the side button.

  1. Press the Bixby button on the left side of the phone, right under the volume rocker.
  2. In the top menu bar, tap the Settings button (looks like three cogs).
  3. Uncheck Bixby Key.

That’s it! Now when you press the Bixby button once, it won’t open the Bixby Home

How to remove Bixby Home from the home screen

Now, the final step to disabling Bixby entirely is to disable Bixby Home access from the home screen which, by default, puts it on the left-most panel.

  1. From the home screen, hold down on empty space until the menu appears.
  2. Swipe to the right to reach the left home panel.
  3. Disable Bixby Home.

That’s it! Now neither the Bixby button nor the Bixby Home screen will work and you can move on with your life, Bixby-free.

Should you want to access Bixby again, though, you’ll need to follow these steps in reverse, first enabling Bixby Home from the launcher and then the Bixby button from inside the menu.

Essential Galaxy S10 accessories

AUKEY 10,000mAh Power Bank with 18W USB-C and Quick Charge 3.0

$30 at Amazon

This power bank strikes a good balance between capacity and portability, at 10,000mAh. It has USB-C to quickly recharge and provide power output to modern phones, and it also has Qualcomm Quick Charge to juice up your Galaxy S10 as quick as a wall plug.

Samsung 256GB EVO Plus microSD Card

$50 at Amazon

Triple your phone’s storage with tons of extra room for photos, videos, music and more. You don’t have to go all-out with a massive card, but still get a ton of extra space for a good price.

Anker PowerPort Qi Charging Pad

$22 at Amazon

This affordable 10W fast wireless charging pad is thinner on your desk or nightstand than most chargers on the market — even most of Samsung’s — and a ring of LEDs makes it easy to tell if your phone is charging or fully charged. It’s also about half the price of Samsung’s competitor.

Master your camera with this $19 photography training

Photography Diploma Masterclass

Put down your phone and pick up your camera. If you’re a bit baffled by all of the buttons and settings, do yourself a favor and sign up for the Photography Diploma Masterclass.

Live Online Academy’s month-long Photography Diploma Masterclass will help you go from fully automatic to fully manual shooting. For just a few hours every week, you’ll learn how to capture the beauty around you like a pro.

You’ll begin with basics, like camera types, functions, and the specific situations that call for each model. Then you’ll dive into essential photography skills, from focus and exposure to the relationship between shutter speed and aperture. 

To round out the training, you’ll even take a look at popular editing programs and identify the key differences between them.

The Photography Masterclass at a glance:

  • Access eight lessons over a one-month period, with three hours of coursework per week.
  • Explore photographic styles and how they’re used as forms of communication.
  • Study common functions that appear on most cameras.
  • Explore the most frequently used lenses and when and where they are used.
  • Learn how to use light meters to understand your exposure.
  • Understand light sources, using focus, different types of cameras, and much more.

Typically $395, you can enroll in the Photography Diploma Masterclass today for just $19. Upon completion, you’ll get a CPD certification to validate your new and improved camera skills.

The promotion ends in a few days, so check it out via the button below.

The AAPicks team writes about things we think you’ll like, and we may see a share of revenue from any purchases made through affiliate links. To see all our hottest deals, head over to the AAPICKS HUB.

Like this deal? Check out Vault — you’ll get four premium tools, including NordVPN and Dashlane, to supercharge your online security. Enter code VAULTONE to try it out for just $1!

Deal: Get a Samsung Galaxy S9 for $275 if you switch to Cricket

Since the Samsung Galaxy S9 is now just over a year old, it’s already seen some pretty deep discounts. However, this Samsung Galaxy S9 deal at Cricket Wireless is something else.

Right now, if you port your number to Cricket, you can grab a new Galaxy S9 for just $275. Coincidentally, Samsung itself has the device on sale right now, and even that sale still has it at $500, literally twice the price.

Of course, you do need to port your number to Cricket Wireless, which is certainly a bit of a roadblock in this Samsung Galaxy S9 deal. You also can’t port your number from AT&T — all other carriers are OK, but since Cricket is an AT&T sub-brand, no AT&T ports are allowed for this deal.

Editor’s Pick

The fine print for the deal says that it is only valid for online sales and runs from now until May 18, 2019. It also says that the device “may” be restricted to Cricket Wireless service for six months after activation, which means you likely can’t port your number, get the phone, and then port out.

Regardless, if you were already thinking about switching to Cricket Wireless, this Samsung Galaxy S9 deal makes the decision a no-brainer now.

Click the button below to grab this deal!

Affiliate disclosure: We may receive compensation in connection with your purchase of products via links on this page. The compensation received will never influence the content, topics or posts made in this blog. See our disclosure policy for more details.

Get 100K bonus points with this Marriott Amex offer

Heads up! We share savvy shopping and personal finance tips to put extra cash in your wallet. Mobile Nations may receive a commission from The Points Guy Affiliate Network.

Update: Hurry! The 100,000 point sign-up bonus for the Marriott Bonvoy Brilliant™ American Express Card ends on April 24. Make sure you get your application in before the deadline to take advantage of this huge offer.

Now through April 24th, you can earn a 100,000 point welcome bonus (valued at $900) with the Marriott Bonvoy Brilliant™ American Express Card. To do so, you’ll have to spend $5,000 in the first three months of card opening. And since this is Marriott’s premium card, the Bonvoy will come with a $450 annual fee but plenty of valuable perks:

Premium benefits

Marriott Bonvoy Brilliant™ American Express® Card

See at The Points Guy

This card lets you earn 6x points at participating Marriott Bonvoy Hotels, 3x points at U.S. restaurants and flights booked directly with airlines, and 2x points on everything else. It also comes with a $300 annual credit towards Marriott purchases and a 1 Free Night Award on your card account anniversary (worth up to 50,000 points) at a participating hotel.

In addition to incredible earning opportunities, cardholders will also receive automatic Marriott Bonvoy Gold Elite Status. Just by having the card, you’ll receive 25% point bonuses, priority late check outs, welcome gifts, and much more. And as with other premium cards, the Bonvoy will cover your application fee for Global Entry ($100 value) or TSA PreCheck ($85 value).

The Marriott Bonvoy Business™ American Express® Card is also eligible for the 100,000 point bonus when you charge $5,000 in purchases within the first 3 months. The annual fee checks in at $125.

Business card

Marriott Bonvoy Business™ American Express® Card

See at The Points Guy

This card also earns 6x points at participating Marriott Bonvoy hotels. Additional earn rates include 4x points at U.S. restaurants and gas stations. You’ll receive 1 Free Night Award every year after your Card account anniversary and have the opportunity to earn an additional Free Night Award when you charge $60K to your card in a calendar year. Night Awards cover redemption levels up to 35,000 Marriott Bonvoy points at participating hotels. Cardholders status begins at Marriott Bonvoy Silver Elite.

The question now becomes: How do you spend all these new points? Well if you’re like me and prefer the most economical route, you can stretch your points furthest by booking nights at Category 1 hotels, which include brands like Courtyard and Fairfield. A standard award for a Category 1 hotel only costs 7,500 points. Thus, you could turn your 100,000 point bonus into over a dozen free nights. On the other hand, maybe you’d like to splurge a bit. Consider a category 6 hotel which requires 50,000 points/night. You could get two nights at luxurious hotels such as the W Shanghai or the Ritz-Carlton Bali. To lock in these possibilities, act quickly as this limited time bonus offer only lasts until April 24th.

HP announces first 15-inch Chromebook, with backlit keys and number pad

A promotional image of the HP Chromebook 15, HP's first 15-inch Chromebook. CNET

The world of Chromebooks just keeps on growing, both literally and figuratively. Case in point, HP just announced the HP Chromebook 15, the company’s first 15-inch Chrome OS laptop (via CNET).

Because of its sheer size, HP was able to cram a full number pad next to the typical keyboard, which is certainly nice if you need a number pad on your laptop.

That keyboard also features backlit keys, which is always a nice touch, especially on a Chromebook which usually costs much less than a typical Windows- or Mac OS-based laptop. Above that keyboard is a 15.6-inch FHD IPS BrightView WLED-backlit touchscreen with a 1,920 x 1,080 resolution.

Editor’s Pick

Inside, the HP Chromebook 15 is powered by an Intel Pentium Gold 4417U CPU, 4GB of DDR4 SDRAM, 64GB of eMMC storage, and integrated Intel HD Graphics 610. The laptop weighs about four pounds, and HP claims it gets up to 13 hours of battery life.

Outside, you’ll find a standard selection of ports, including a microSD card reader, two USB-C 3.1 ports, and one typical USB 3.1 port.

The HP Chromebook 15 starts at $449 and comes in two colors: Cloud Blue or Mineral Silver. HP says the laptop is available now in the U.S., but according to its website it is listed as “Coming Soon.” HP also said the laptop is coming to the U.K. and Australia, but declined to announce pricing (or availability) for those regions.

If you’re interested in this laptop, be sure to check the HP site over the next few days to see when the listing goes live.

Affiliate disclosure: We may receive compensation in connection with your purchase of products via links on this page. The compensation received will never influence the content, topics or posts made in this blog. See our disclosure policy for more details.

Here’s how good the Galaxy Note 9’s battery life is in the real world

Best answer: Samsung could finally tout a Note with battery life to match its size and capabilities thanks to the Note 9. It can go all day with a good amount of battery to spare, even if you make no attempt to change its behavior in the name of battery life. The only modern Galaxy phone that bests it is the latest and greatest Galaxy S10+, and the improvement isn’t huge.

Solid battery, at a discount: Samsung Galaxy Note 9 ($720 at Amazon)

All-day battery life

With over 20% more capacity than the Note 8 and a new slate of more efficient components, the Note 9 is a full-day phone for me without any question.

It was easy to expect ending each day with 20-30% battery left, even with no attempt to conserve.

In months using it, I have ended most days with about 20-30% battery remaining, which is a healthy buffer zone that can absorb any abnormally heavy usage that may come from time to time. I reach that mark after 15-16 hours off the charger, typically with about 3 hours of “screen on” time. I make no overt attempts to conserve battery life on my Note 9 — I use automatic brightness, leave all of my accounts syncing, have many notifications turn on, leave Wi-Fi and Bluetooth on all day, and use Bluetooth audio multiple hours a day. Samsung’s battery information screen gives you an accurate representation of how long your phone will last based on your past week of use, and my Note 9 consistently offers me 22-24 hours of estimated time 100-0%, which is a little on the high side compared to what I actually end up getting, but it’s not far off.

Samsung’s screen is very efficient, but how long it’s turned on is still a big determination of battery drain, as it’s still the top battery consumer on any given day. The Always On Display, too, is a consistent drainer, making up about 5% of my battery usage daily. Streaming media or even playing casual games really doesn’t hit battery life that hard — the only thing that’s a truly heavy drain on the Note 9 in my experience is running Google Maps navigation in the Android Auto app, which has the screen on at high brightness while using GPS and LTE constantly.

The screen is still a sizable part of battery drain, as is Always On Display.

Samsung phones always take a few days to “settle in” to optimal battery performance in my experience, as it takes a little bit of usage for the battery optimization features to take hold. The system goes through and automatically optimizes lesser-used apps from waking up and syncing unnecessarily in the background, which in my experience works seamlessly with no consequences. You can, of course, go in and whitelist apps to do whatever they wish, but I haven’t needed to do this in Samsung’s latest software. I had a “just use it and see what happens” philosophy with the Note 9, as shown with my usage patterns above, and it’s worked out just fine — that’s the kind of confidence that’s important to have in a big phone like this.

This isn’t a multi-day phone, at least without seriously changing how you use it.

What the Note 9 won’t be able to offer is full multi-day usage — that is, unless you severely limit what the phone is doing and what you use it for. Even with extremely basic usage, I easily dip under the 50% mark in any given day, meaning there’s no way I could let it sit overnight and then get a whole day out of it again. Overnight standby battery life alone is going to take a little chunk out of that, using up 0.5-1% per hour while on Wi-Fi, even with Always On Display turned off. The battery is good enough to get you through a full day, night and the next morning — but you’ll have to hit a charger at some point before noon to keep going for the rest of the day.

But with this capacity, more is always possible if you’re willing to dramatically change the way you use your phone. Turn off Always On Display for starters, limit the number of apps providing push notifications, turn off unused radios, limit screen brightness and use Power Saving Mode regularly, and sure you could get through two full days if you really need to. But Samsung wasn’t designing for this use case — it wanted to give enough capacity to get even hardcore users through a full day, not try and be a true two-day phone without limiting its usefulness.

Good enough charging speeds

I’ve been one of many people consistently chastising Samsung for its decision to stick with the same charger its been using since the Galaxy S6, a basic USB-A plug that operates on Quick Charge 2.0 technology. The argument for faster charging came back to the surface with the Note 9’s larger battery, which would presumably take longer to charge than the Galaxy S9+’s. Thankfully, that isn’t actually the case.

Despite using the same charger, the Note 9 charges to full in the same amount of time as a GS9+.

For whatever reason — likely a handful of purposeful tweaks in the system — the Galaxy Note 9 charges at a higher wattage from this standard Samsung charger than previous Samsungs. Plugging into this 15W charger the Note 9 draws a consistent 14.5W, whereas the Note 8 draws between 13.5-14.5W. The Note 9 also doesn’t seem to drop charging speed when the screen is on, which is something I’ve observed in both previous phones.

That increase in (and sustained) wattage makes sure the Note 9 charges 0-100% in the same amount of time as previous phones, despite its 14% larger battery than the Galaxy S9+. Charging time is roughly 1 hour and 40 minutes, depending on how much the phone is doing during that period, which is pretty good. Better yet the Note 9 also supports the same charging speed from a 15W+ USB-C PD charger, so you don’t have to stick with a Quick Charge plug to get the fastest speeds.

Knowing you can have this larger capacity and strong battery life without giving up on overall charging speed compared to the rest of the recent big Galaxy phones is reassuring. But I still wish Samsung would’ve found a way to get Quick Charge 3.0 or even 4.0 in here. Not necessarily for fast 0-100% charging, which we almost never need in the real world, but for quicker 0-30% or 15-45% charges, which is the most critical time where every minute matters.

Great battery life

Galaxy Note 9

$720 at Amazon

Great battery life still, with a more attractive price.

The Note 9 has great battery life, consistently leaving you with reserves at the end of even heavy days. As far as Samsung phones go, it’s only been bested in battery life by the new Galaxy S10+, which makes the Note 9 a great value considering the price cuts that drove it down near $700, hundreds less than the S10+.

Give your Galaxy a boost

Anker 30W 2-Port Charger with 18W USB-C Power Delivery and 12W PowerIQ

$22 at Amazon

The wall charger that comes in the box with your Note 9 is fine, but you’ll probably need more than one at some point. Might as well make it a super-capable unit with USB-C POD and fast USB-A charging together — Anker has you covered for about $20.

AUKEY 10,000mAh Power Bank with 18W USB-C and Quick Charge 3.0

$30 at Amazon

Aukey’s 10,000mAh power bank offers the best of both worlds: it charges your Note 9 at its maximum Quick Charge or USB-C PD speeds, and the power bank itself recharges quickly via USB-C PD.

Anker PowerPort Qi Charging Pad

$22 at Amazon

This $18 Qi charging pad is not only affordable, but it also has fast charging that lets you top up your Note 9 at 10W. There’s an LED ring around the mat that lets you know if your phone is charging or fully charged.

Google tries to fend off man-in-the-middle attacks with a clever workaround

The Google Chrome app on Android.

Google announced today on its Security Blog that it will block sign-ins from embedded browser frameworks starting in June. The hope is that such a move will better protect people from man-in-the-middle (MITM) attacks.

Embedded browser frameworks allow developers to include web instances in their applications. For example, Spotify uses embedded browser frameworks to allow folks to sign into their Facebook accounts. The idea behind embedded browser frameworks is to improve the user experience by keeping people in an app instead of kicking them to a full browser if they want to sign into a service.

Editor’s Pick

The problem is that a MITM attack can intercept login credentials and second factors. According to Google, it’s unable to “differentiate between a legitimate sign-in and a MITM attack” in embedded browsers. Google’s solution, then, is to block sign-ins from embedded browser frameworks altogether.

As a result, Google wants developers to switch to browser-based OAuth authentication. That way, apps will send users to Chrome, Safari, Firefox, or other mobile browsers if they want to sign into a service.

It might seem more inconvenient relative to how sign-ins work now, but today’s announcement means that people can see a page’s full URL. That way, people know whether the page they’re typing their login credentials into is legitimate or not.

Developers with apps that requires access to Google Account data are encouraged to switch to using browser-based OAuth authentication today.

READ: You can now use your Android phone as a security key: Here’s how to do it

The best Galaxy S8+ cases you can buy

The Galaxy S8+ is no spring chicken — and I mean that in the best possible way — but if you’re still proudly rocking one, then you’ll want to protect its delicate all-glass construction from drops and shatters that will have you shelling out hundreds of dollars to replace the screen or replace the whole phone. Two years on, the case pool for the S8+ has dwindled a little, but there’s still plenty of quality cases to pick from.

Ready for the real world

Supcase Unicorn Hybrid Beetle Pro

Staff pick

This ruggedly handsome case combines an impact-resistant TPU with a hard plastic shell and a protective front casing that offers ample protection around that beautiful AMOLED screen. There are four color options and even a built-in kickstand for your YouTube binges.

$20 at Amazon

Clear as crystal

Spigen Liquid Crystal

This clear case is one of the most reliably simple yet satisfactory clear case series around, and we’re still confident swearing by Spigen’s Liquid Crystal and Liquid Crystal Glitter cases for a slim scratch-resistant case that shows off the S8+’s beauty.

$9 at Amazon

Heavy duty for less

OtterBox Commuter Series

OtterBox is known for tank-like ready-for-anything heavy-duty cases, and while the Commuter Series is still firmly heavy-duty, it’s not quite as cumbersome as some of its other series (looking at YOU, Defender) and it’s best color is the cheapest. Go, Aqua Mint!

From $17 at Amazon

Our favorite series

Spigen Neo Hybrid

The Neo Hybrid is a hybrid case that’s as thin as a single-layer TPU case and stylish as all get-out, so it’s no wonder that we here at Android Central love it to pieces — quite literally. The Neo Hybrid has more color choices for the S8+ two years on than the brand-new S10!

From $14 at Amazon

Geometric gorgeousness

Ringke Air Prism

There are Plain Jane clear cases like the Liquid Crystal, but that’s not the only clear case around! The Air Prism has a sleek, ever-so-mesmerizing geometric pattern on the back so that it’s not just another flat piece of plastic and I love mine so much.

$9 at Amazon

Clear and colorful

i-Blason Ares

This heavy-duty case may protect your phone like a bank vault, but it will still show off the S8’s stylish glass back and even help your chosen color pop with front and rear accents like blue, green, gold, and even pink. It even has a built-in screen protector.

$20 at Amazon

Vintage and vivacious

Snakehive Leather Wallet

Snakehive’s leather wallet cases are made of European Nubuck leather, can hold up to three cards and cash, and come a wide variety of single and two-tone color schemes. The two-tones are a little bit cheaper and a little bit cooler, but the solids are sweet, too.

From $30 at Amazon

Hide yo wallet

Spigen Slim Armor CS

This case will hide your cards or cash in plain sight behind a delightfully clicky card slot embedded in the polycarbonate back of this sturdy hybrid case. While you could maybe fit two cards and cash, I suggest going with one card and cash or two cards.

From $16 at Amazon

Keep it slim

TORRAS Ultra Thin

This snap-on polycarbonate case comes in three sugary shades from candy apple red to cotton candy pink and licorice black. While this case is light on drop protection, it stays out of the way and protects against from scratches and scuffs from tabletops and pocket change.

$13 at Amazon

While it’s hard to say no to the many color combos of the Spigen Neo Hybrid, I’d recommend the Supcase Unicorn Beetle Hybrid Pro because it’s a heavy-duty case built for the long haul, and two years on, protection is key. If you prefer your protection in a more stylish form, go for the i-Blason Ares, which features a clear back, sweet accents, and a built-in screen protector.

If you do not want to bulk up such as big phone, I understand, and you’ll still be more than happy with the Spigen Liquid Crystal adding much-needed grip while showing off the S8+’s slim sexiness.

How to boot Windows 10 in Safe Mode

If you’re trying to troubleshoot problems with your Windows 10 PC, one option is to enter Safe Mode. In Windows 10 Safe Mode you can safely uninstall troublesome programs, resolve driver issues, diagnose hardware conflicts, and more. But how to boot in Safe Mode is less obvious in Windows 10 than we’ve seen in older Windows releases. In this guide we’ll show you how to start Windows 10 in Safe Mode using version 1809 (October 2018 Update).

Use the Settings app

Windows 10 access Settings

1. Click the Start button and select the “gear” icon on the Start Menu to open the Settings app.

Windows 10 Update and security

2. Select Update & security.

Windows 10 Recovery restart now

3. Select Recovery.
4. Under Advanced startup, click the Restart now button.

Window 10 Choose an option troubleshoot

5. Your PC will restart. Once it reaches the Choose an option screen, select Troubleshoot.

Widows 10 Troubleshoot Advanced options

6. Select Advanced options.

Windows 10 Advanced Options Startup settings

7. Select Startup Settings.

Windows 10 startup settings restart

8. Select Restart.

Windows 10 Safe Mode options

9. Once your PC restarts again, select 4 or press F4 on the list of options to enter Safe Mode. If you need access to the internet, select 5 or press F5. To use the Command Prompt with Safe Mode, select 6 or press F6.

Related: How to stream the Xbox One to Windows 10

From the Start Menu

Windows 10 restart PC

1. Press and hold the Shift key. Do not release!
2. Click the Start button.
3. Click the Power button icon on the Start Menu.
4. Select Restart.

Window 10 Choose an option troubleshoot

5. The PC will reboot to the Choose an option screen. Select Troubleshoot.

Widows 10 Troubleshoot Advanced options

6. Select Advanced options.

Windows 10 Advanced Options Startup settings

7. Select Startup Settings.

Windows 10 startup settings restart

8. Select Restart.

Windows 10 Safe Mode options

9. Once your PC restarts again, select 4 or press F4 on the list of options to enter Safe Mode. If you need access to the internet, select 5 or press F5. To use the Command Prompt with Safe Mode, select 6 or press F6.

Related: How to text with iMessages in Windows 10

From the sign-in screen

Windows 10 Sign-in screen power button

1. Press and hold the Shift key. Do not release!
2. Click the Power button icon located in the bottom-right corner.
3. Select Restart.

Window 10 Choose an option troubleshoot

4. Once your PC starts, select Troubleshoot on the Choose an option screen.

Widows 10 Troubleshoot Advanced options

5. Select Advanced options.

Windows 10 Advanced Options Startup settings

6. Select Startup Settings.

Windows 10 startup settings restart

7. Select Restart.

Windows 10 Safe Mode options

8. Once your PC restarts again, select 4 or press F4 on the list of options to enter Safe Mode. If you need access to the internet, select 5 or press F5. To use the Command Prompt with Safe Mode, select 6 or press F6.

Related: How to split your screen in windows 10

From the Recovery Environment

1. Turn off your PC. When it initially reboots, press and hold down the power button for 10 seconds when you immediately see the manufacturer’s logo or the Windows 10 logo. This turns off your PC.
2. Turn on your PC. When Windows 10 restarts, press and hold down the power button again for 10 seconds. This will turn off your PC.
3. Turn on your PC. Windows 10 should now enter the Recovery Environment. If not, follow step #2.
4. Select your account.

Windows 10 automatic repair advanced options

5. After Windows 10 performs a diagnosis, select Advanced options on the Automatic Repair screen.

Window 10 Choose an option troubleshoot

6. Select Troubleshoot.

Widows 10 Troubleshoot Advanced options

7. Select Advanced options.

Windows 10 Advanced Options Startup settings

8. Select Startup Settings.

Windows 10 startup settings restart

9. Select Restart.

Windows 10 Safe Mode options

10. Once your PC restarts, select 4 or press F4 on the list of options to enter Safe Mode. If you need access to the internet, select 5 or press F5. To use the Command Prompt with Safe Mode, select 6 or press F6.

Use the System Configuration tool

Windows 10 launch Msconfig

1. In Cortana’s search field on the taskbar, type msconfig.
2. Select the System Configuration desktop app in the results.

Windows 10 system config safe boot

3. Once the tool loads, select the Boot tab.
4. Check the Safe boot box.
5. Check Minimal.
6. Click OK.

Windows 10 system config restart

7. Click Restart if you want to restart now. Click Exit without restart if you need to safe your work first.
8. The PC will restart and immediately enter Safe Mode.

Use installation media

1. Insert your CD, DVD, Blu-ray, or USB drive containing Windows 10.
2. Turn on your PC.
3. Press any key to boot from the installation media.

Windows 10 install prompt

4. In the initial setup window, select your preferred language, time and currency format, keyboard region, and then click the Next button.

Windows 10 repair your computer

5. Click the Repair your computer link in the next window.

Window 10 Choose an option troubleshoot

6. On the following Choose an option panel, select Troubleshoot.

Windows 10 Adv options command prompt

7. Select Command Prompt on the following Advanced Options screen.

Windows 10 Safeboot minimal

8. Type the command bcdedit /set {default} safeboot minimal and press Enter.
9. A message stating The operation completed successfully should appear. Close the Command Prompt window.
10. Select Continue on the Choose an option window.
11. Your PC will now enter Windows 10 Safe Mode each time you start it..

Windows 10 Safeboot delete value

12. To put Windows 10 back into its normal boot mode, repeat the previous steps but enter the following command in the Command Prompt: bcdedit /deletevalue {default} safeboot

Use recovery media

1. Insert your CD, DVD, Blu-ray or USB drive you created as a recovery device.
2. Turn on your PC.
3. Press any key to boot from the recovery media.

Windows 10 choose keyboard layout

4. Choose a keyboard layout when prompted.

Windows 10 choose troubleshoot

5. On the Choose an option screen, select Troubleshoot.

Windows 10 choose advanced options

6. Select Advanced options.
7. Select Command Prompt.

Windows 10 Safeboot minimal

8. Type the command bcdedit /set {default} safeboot minimal and press Enter.
9. A message stating The operation completed successfully should appear. Close the Command Prompt window.
10. Select Continue on the Choose an option window.
11. Your PC will now enter Windows 10 Safe Mode each time you start it.

Windows 10 Safeboot delete value

12. To put Windows 10 back into its normal boot mode, repeat the previous steps but enter the following command in the Command Prompt: bcdedit /deletevalue {default} safeboot

Use the F8 key

Windows 10 Type Run Command

1. In Cortana’s search field on the taskbar, type Run.
2. Select the Run desktop app in the results.

Windows 10 run Command Prompt

3. In the text entry box next to Open, type cmd.
4. Press CTRL + SHIFT + ENTER simultaneously. Do not click the OK button.
5. Select Yes on the following User Account Control pop-up.

Windows 10 enable F8 boot option

6. In Command Prompt, type the following: bcdedit /set {default} bootmenupolicy legacy
7. Close the Command Prompt and reboot the PC.
8. Before the Windows 10 logo appears, press the F8 key.
9. On the following list, select one of the three Safe Mode options. This “legacy” screen will have white text on a black background.
10. If you want to remove the F8 key function, use this command: bcdedit /set {default} bootmenupolicy standard

The Startup Settings screen should revert back to white text on a blue background.


That wraps up our guide on how to enter Safe Mode in Windows 10. For additional tips and tricks, take a look at these Windows 10 guides: