Android 9 Pie rolling out to Honor View 10 in the US

The Honor View 10 is one of the very few Huawei-made devices to be available in the United States. Those of you U.S. citizens who bought the popular 2017 smartphone will likely be excited to know that EMUI 9 — based on Android 9 Pie — is rolling out to U.S. variants now.

This update is build number 9.0.0.201 (C567E6R1P12) which is specifically for the Honor View 10 model BKL-L04.

Since the update carries Android 9 Pie, it comes with the usual Pie upgrades such as adaptive battery, navigation gestures, revamped UI elements, etc. You can read all about what Pie has to offer in our roundup here.

Editor’s Pick

EMUI 9 also has some specific upgrades of its own, such as more AI features, an upgraded game optimization program, etc. Check out what EMUI 9 has to offer here.

You likely will receive an OTA notification soon which you can use to upgrade your device. However, if you want to upgrade manually, you can open the HiCare app, select Update, and then follow the on-screen prompts.

If you don’t already own an Honor View 10, the device is going for only $389 on Amazon.com right now. Click below to grab one!

Honor 10 Lite hands-on: The budget selfie king?

Last month, we reviewed the Honor 10. The device was admirable for something that only costs 399 euros (~$453), bringing last year’s flagship Kirin 970 processor, plenty of RAM and storage, and a high resolution camera.

The phone brought quite a lot of value to the mid-range market, but Honor is looking to introduce an option for those on an even tighter budget.

We just got our hands on the Honor 10 Lite, and here are our first impressions.

Honor 10 lite rear

Related:

The Honor 10 Lite is definitely a flashy device. While it comes in standard black and silver colors that shimmer in Honor’s classic “Aurora” pattern, there’s also now a sky blue option which transitions from a light baby blue at the bottom to silver at the top. I think it looks quite good.

However, it’s proven to be a fingerprint magnet during the time I’ve had with it.

Honor 10 lite standing back

There is a fingerprint reader nested in the top third of the device with a 13MP and 2MP dual-camera setup sitting to the top left. These sensors have apertures of f/1.8 and f/2.4 respectively. The 13MP sensor is the primary camera while the second is primarily used for depth sensing.

The glass on the back feels fairly premium, but the aluminum sides feel a bit cheap. It’s also fairly light at 162 grams.

Honor 10 lite screen notch
Honor 10 lite chin

The Honor 10 Lite has a 6.21-inch 1080p LCD display with a small waterdrop-style notch design. This notch houses a 24MP selfie camera with an f/2.0 aperture. It can recognize up to eight different selfie scenarios and react appropriately, adding things like color adjustments and skin smoothing. It also offers multiple different studio lighting modes.

The screen isn’t incredibly disappointing, but it does make it clear that this isn’t a flagship device. There is a noticeable difference in quality between this panel and the Honor 10. Even though the colors are quite deep and punchy, the display feels almost matte, and could definitely be sharper.

Honor 10 lite micro usb
Honor 10 lite headphone jack
Honor 10 lite bottom

The clear sign this is a budget device comes in the form of a MicroUSB port on the bottom of the phone. A single bottom-firing speaker and a headphone jack sit on either side of the port. The headphone jack seems to have become a budget feature, but I’m very glad to see it included nonetheless.

The other budget giveaway is the phone’s specs. The Honor 10 Lite is powered by Huawei’s Kirin 710 mobile chipset, 3GB of RAM and 64GB of storage. This won’t come close to competing with Huawei’s flagship Kirin 980 or even last year’s Kirin 970, though the octa-core processor should perform decently for everyday tasks. However, we’ll have to wait to review the device in full before we can make a final verdict. There is a microSD card slot in the device, which can expand the total storage capacity up to 512GB.

Honor 10 lite screen

The Honor 10 Lite runs on EMUI 9.1, based on Android 9 Pie. EMUI has quite a controversial user interface — most people either love it or hate it. The phone comes with standard Android soft keys and no app drawer, but users can toggle on gesture navigation and even enable the app drawer if they want.

We won’t have official European pricing for the device until it officially launches in the U.K., but the phone costs 799 dirham in the United Arab Emirates, about 192 euros or $217. That’s about half the cost of the Honor 10, so this could be a great option for fans of the company with a bit tighter budget.

What are your thoughts on the Honor 10 Lite? Is it the budget device you’ve been waiting for?

Let us know!

Honor Magic 2 review: A phone full of new tricks

The Honor Magic 2 is an exclusive smartphone to China markets, but it’s a very compelling device and could pave the way for future smartphones. It has a slider design, six cameras, an in-screen fingerprint sensor, and a notch-free bezel-less display.

Is the experience as magical as it sounds or is this phone simply just smoke and mirrors? Find out in our Honor Magic 2 review.

Design

Honor Magic 2

On the outside, the Honor Magic 2 looks like your average flagship smartphone. It’s constructed of glass panels on the front and rear with a metal frame holding it all together. The build quality is exceptional. The entire phone makes heavy use of rounded corners, sides, and tapered edges for a sleek appearance that’s more comfortable.

Honor Magic 2 slider

The slider form factor allows Honor to achieve a nearly bezel-less screen with no notch and have the front facing cameras hidden.

What makes the Honor Magic 2’s design unique is its slider mechanism. This is similar to the Xiaomi Mi Mix 3 and will give you feelings of nostalgia if you ever used old school slider phones from yesteryears. The slider form factor allows Honor to achieve a nearly bezel-less screen with no notch and have the front facing cameras hidden. Sliding the screen downwards will reveal the three front-facing cameras.

Honor Magic 2 front camera

Having a moving part on a smartphone undoubtedly raises concerns over hardware failure but I don’t see this slider failing anytime soon. The slider mechanism feels sturdy, durable, and solidly holds the front and back half of the phone into place whether the phone is opened or closed. The slider mechanism does, however, prevent the phone from being water and dust resistant. Dust actually collects quite easily in the areas exposed when the slider is open. So far this hasn’t negatively affected the Magic 2 in any way, but do your best to keep these areas clean all the same.

Honor Magic 2

Just like the Huawei P20 Pro from Honor’s parent company, the Magic 2 features gradient color schemes. The model I’ve been using is the black edition, but it looks more silver than black. The Magic 2 also comes in red and blue variants. The black model flows from a bright silver on the top half to a dark blue on the bottom half of the phone. The gradient color is beautiful and eye-catching, but the reflective finish makes the Magic 2 hard to keep clean from fingerprints. The protruding camera lenses on the rear are also a magnet for dust and equally difficult to keep clean.

Display

Honor Magic 2 display

The Honor Magic 2 features a large 6.39-inch full-view 2,340 x 1,080 AMOLED display with incredibly thin bezels surrounding all sides. As mentioned earlier, there is no notch, so you get a fullscreen experience with no cutout. The display looks gorgeous. Colors are vibrant, viewing angles are fantastic, and the screen is sharp and crisp. Viewing content on this display is enjoyable and text and graphics are easy to read. Outdoor visibility on the Magic 2’s display also posed no issues, it gets plenty bright to comfortably see in direct sunlight.

Performance

Honor Magic 2

Editor’s Pick

The Honor Magic 2 is no slouch in performance. The Magic 2 has the same horsepower as the Huawei Mate 20 Pro, with a Kirin 980 SoC and 6GB or 8GB of RAM. The Kirin 980 is one of the most powerful chipsets on the market so it’s no surprise that the Magic 2 performs very well in benchmarks and real-world use. The phone is extremely fast to launch applications, multitask, and navigating through the UI is a silky smooth experience. Gaming is also great. High-end titles from the Google Play Store such as Shadowgun Legends runs smoothly with great graphics and consistent frame rates.





Battery life performance is equally impressive. Although the 3,400mAh battery is not as large as those of Huawei’s P series and Mate series, it’s been more than adequate for the Honor Magic 2. With a good mixture of reading emails, text messages, browsing social media, playing games, and watching YouTube, Magic 2 easily lasted me through a full day. Screen-on time consistently reached the five-hour mark which should be more than enough for most users. The Honor Magic 2 also features a 40W fast charger in the box that gets you a 50 percent charge in only 15 minutes.




Hardware

Honor Magic 2 usb c

Hardware on the Honor Magic 2 is fairly run of the mill. There’s a single USB Type-C port at the bottom accompanied by a single speaker. You won’t find a headphone jack anywhere on the device. There’s also no wireless charging or microSD expansion but the Magic 2 offers plenty of internal storage with 128 and 256-gigabyte options.

Honor Magic 2 fingerprint sensor

It isn’t frustratingly awful to use but it’s not as good as a standard fingerprint sensor.

The Honor Magic 2 has an in-display fingerprint sensor, similar to the Oppo R17 Pro and the OnePlus 6T. A small area of the display is illuminated with a fingerprint graphic to show you where to place your finger to properly unlock the device. One thing all in-display fingerprint sensors currently have in common is their slowness an inconsistency — the Magic 2 is no different. It isn’t frustratingly awful to use but it’s not as good as a standard fingerprint sensor. This technology will get considerably better over time but we probably won’t get to that point until next year.

Camera

Honor Magic 2 rear cameras

Another truly unique feature of the Honor Magic 2 is the camera setup, because it has six sensors — three on the rear and three on the front. The main camera on the rear is a 16-megapixel f/1.8 lens, accompanied by a 16-megapixel wide angle and 24-megapixel monochrome sensor. The monochrome sensor is used for capturing black and white photos and portrait mode photography.

Honor Magic 2

The main front-facing camera is also 16MP, flanked by two additional 2MP cameras. The main sensor is the only one for taking photos, while the 2MP sensors are meant for 3D facial unlocking, portrait mode, and portrait mode lighting effects. The 3D facial unlock works very well and is extremely fast. Slide the phone open to reveal the camera, and the phone unlocks before you know it. This is a much more secure option for unlocking the Magic 2, and it’s much faster and more reliable than the fingerprint sensor.

Both the front and rear cameras take advantage of the Kirin 980’s NPU, incorporating AI scene recognition. This means the camera can recognize scenes and objects like food, plants, urban landscapes, pets, and more, and adjust the image accordingly for the best results. While having the AI scene recognition enabled makes a difference in the way the images look, it isn’t easily noticeable in every scene. In some situations, you might even prefer your photos without the AI enhancements and it’s probably better to keep it turned off if you prefer to tweak your images manually.



General image quality from the rear camera is quite impressive and I found very little to complain about with the Magic 2 as my daily smartphone camera. The camera produces sharp images with accurate colors and excellent contrast. Dynamic range on the Honor Magic 2’s cameras provides great shadow and highlight detail and high contrast situations were handled very well. The camera also performs well in low light. Details are still very crisp and sharp, images are still full of color, and there is very little noise. Highlights in low light situations are handled very well thanks to the camera’s excellent dynamic range. There’s no blooming or overexposure which helps retain plenty of detail.

We’ve included a gallery below for easy viewing but you can see the full resolution images by clicking here.

Software

Honor Magic 2

If you don’t like EMUI, the Magic 2 won’t do much to change your opinion.

The Honor Magic 2 ships with the latest Android 9.0 Pie with Magic UI 2.0 on top. Magic UI is essentially the same interface as EMUI found on other Honor or Huawei devices, but it’s been rebranded for the Magic 2. If you’ve used EMUI before and enjoy the experience, you’ll feel right at home on the Magic 2. If you don’t like EMUI, the Magic 2 won’t do much to change your opinion. I prefer a more stock-like experience so EMUI’s colorful and cartoonish aesthetics aren’t exactly my cup of tea.




With Magic UI 2.0 Honor has implemented its own AI assistant called “YOYO.” This virtual assistant is machine-learning capable and supposed to have mind-reading capabilities, which sounds strange to say the least. Unfortunately, I was unable to test this feature, as it currently only understands Mandarin. This makes sense considering the Honor Magic 2 is only marketed in China. Because this is a device for China markets you’ll also find many Chinese applications pre-installed. Should this device ever come to other markets these apps will most likely not be installed but it’s something to be aware of should you decide to import the Magic 2.

Specifications

  Honor Magic 2
Display 6.39-inch AMOLED
2340 x 1080
403PPI
SoC Huawei Kirin 980
Octa-core CPU (2 @ 2.6GHz, 2 @ 1.92GHz, 4 @ 1.8GHz)
Dual NPU
GPU Arm Mali-G76 MP10
720Mhz
RAM 6GB/8GB
LPDDR4X
Storage 128GB/256GB
Non-expandable
Cameras Main: 16MP f/1.8 sensor
Second: 16MP f/2.2 ultra wide angle sensor
Third: 24MP f/1.8 monochrome sensor
Front:
Main: 16MP f/2.0 sensor
Second: 2MP f/2.4 sensor
Third: 2MP f/2.4 sensor
Audio No headphone jack
Battery 3,400mAh
40 watt SuperCharge
Sensors Gravity
Proximity
Hall
Ambient Light
Front 3D camera
In-Display Fingerprint
Connectivity Wi-FI 802.11 a/b/g/n/ac, 2.4Ghz/5Ghz
Bluetooth 5.0
Dual frequency GPS
Glonass
Beidou
Galileo
QZSS
NFC
USB Type-C
SIM Dual nano-SIM
Software Magic UI 2.0 or EMUI 9.0
Android 9.0 Pie
Dimensions and weight 157.32 x 75.13 x 8.3mm
206g
Colors Black, Blue, Red

Pricing & final thoughts

Honor Magic 2 design

The Honor Magic 2 costs 3,799 yuan (~$545) for the base model with 6GB RAM and 128GB of storage, 4,299 yuan (~$615) for 8GB RAM and 128GB model, and 4,799 yuan (~$690) for the 8GB RAM version with 256GB of storage. Pricing is very competitive compared to many other flagship smartphones.

Considering how feature packed and powerful the Magic 2 is, it’s a great deal. The notch free display, six cameras, and slider design offer a wonderful and unique hardware experience. The unfortunate part is you’ll most likely pay a lot more to import it, as Honor has no plans to release it elsewhere. If you want a similar slider phone experience, the more widely available Xiaomi Mi Mix 3 might be a better option.

Next: Xiaomi Mi Mix 3 hands-on: The bezel-less slider

Honor to launch mystery smartphone with display hole camera on January 22

  • Honor has sent out invites to a new smartphone launch on January 22, 2019 in Paris.
  • Honor says the phone is coming with a Kirin 980 chip and “in-screen camera display.”
  • The smartphone’s name wasn’t announced.

Honor will launch its first smartphone with a display hole camera in Paris on Jan. 22, 2019. The manufacturer sent out invites to the event earlier today, though it stopped short of naming the handset.

The display hole camera approach puts a phone’s front camera (or cameras) in a floating island within the screen, rather than within the bezel or notch like on previous smartphones. It’s the evolution of the much-maligned notch, before under-display solutions arrive, though it may prove similarly divisive.

The front camera will be located at the top-left of the smartphone, as can be seen in the image below (where the moon is).

An Honor press invite to a smartphone launch showing a night-time Paris scene inside a smartphone.

Other Android manufacturers are expected to use this type of display design on their smartphones throughout 2019, including Samsung with its Galaxy S10 and S10 Plus. However, Huawei — which owns the Honor brand — will have a smartphone with such a display arriving within the next two weeks with the Nova 4.

Little else is known about Honor’s mystery phone, though the company said it would launch with a Kirin 980 chipset — Huawei’s latest flagship SoC. You can find out more details on the chipset at the previous link but it suggests the new Honor will be a premium device.

Editor’s Pick

Honor may be launching this new handset in Europe but it’s calling the event a “global” product launch. Presumably, the phone will be available in India and China around the same time.

As a final note, Honor actually referred to the phone’s panel as an “in-screen camera display,” which might sound like another way of saying under-display camera. Given where this technology seems to be at currently at, though, I strongly doubt Honor is going to be first to launch this on January 22; it’s almost certainly referring to an Infinity-O-like display hole as described.

Honor 8C, the first smartphone with Snapdragon 632 processor, launched in India

The Honor 8C render. Honor

Honor has announced the launch of its ne9w mid-range smartphone, the Honor 8C, in India. Honor 8C is the world’s first smartphone equipped with Qualcomm Snapdragon 632 processor.

Mid-range specifications

Honor 8C is quite an affordable smartphone but manages to pack in mid-range specifications. There’s Snapdragon 632 processor with 4GB of RAM, backed by a large 4000mAh battery. The company claims that the Honor 8C can run for 2 days in one charge.

On the camera front, Honor 8C is equipped with a 13MP + 2MP AI Dual camera with f1.8 aperture and new AI modes that can recognize 22 objects and 500 scenarios. There’s also AI Face Unlock along with an 8MP front-facing camera with soft light.

There’s no Android 9 Pie out of the box since the Honor 8C comes with EMUI 8.2 based on Android 8.1 Oreo.

  Honor 8C
Display 15.9cm HD+ (1520 x 720) TFT LCD (IPS)
269ppi
SoC Qualcomm Snapdragon 632
Octa-Core (8 x 1.8GHz)
RAM 4GB
Storage 32GB/64GB
Expandable up to 256GB with microSD card
Cameras 8M FF front camera

13M + 2M rear camera
PDAF

Battery 4000mAh
Sensors Fingerprint sensor, Proximity sensor, Ambient light sensor, Digital compass, Gravity sensor
Software Android 8.1 Oreo with EMUI 8.2 lite
Dimensions and weight 158.72mm (H) x 75.94mm (W) x 7.98mm (D)
167g
Colors Blue, Black

Pricing and availability

Honor 8C comes in two color variants – Blue and Black – and will go on sale exclusively on Amazon India starting December 10. While the 32GB variant is priced at 11,999, the 64GB variant is priced at 12,999.

What do you think of the new Honor 8C, and its pricing? Tell us in the comments!

Snag a peek at the sleek Honor Magic 2 in white ahead of today’s launch

The front of the Honor Magic 2.

  • A white Honor Magic 2 is in the works, according to pictures uploaded to China’s TENAA website.
  • The images also give us a better look at the slider phone’s design.
  • The device is set to pack a triple-camera setup on the rear, along with multiple cameras on the front.

The Honor Magic 2 is the latest slider flagship of 2018, and the Huawei sub-brand has already given us a good look at the device. Now, ahead of the phone’s launch later today, we’ve received a close look at a new variant.

We already know blue and red Honor Magic 2 variants are coming, but China’s TENAA authority has now uploaded images of a white model. It doesn’t seem like a gradient color, as is the case with the blue and red models, but Huawei has dabbled with a white/yellow/pink gradient before.

The images also show the back of the device when the slider is popped out, revealing a smooth black surface, as you’d expect.

Honor Magic 2 pictures uploaded to TENAA. TENAA

We get a side view of the Honor Magic 2 too, and it doesn’t seem substantially thicker than other phones. In fact, the 8.3mm thickness listed for the device would actually make it slightly thinner than the Mate 20 Pro‘s 8.6mm. This thinner design does seem to come at the expense of battery life, as TENAA lists a 3,400mAh battery compared to the Mate 20 Pro’s 4,200mAh pack.

Editor’s Pick

As for other specs, TENAA lists a 6.39-inch AMOLED screen (2,340×1,080), 8GB of RAM, 128GB of storage, Android Pie, an in-display fingerprint scanner, and no headphone jack. The phone is also expected to pack a Kirin 980 chipset.

The website claims the phone will have six cameras, featuring a 24MP+16MP+16MP trio on the back and a 16MP+2MP+2MP combination on the front. The regulatory body notes that the phone has a “front 3D camera,” ostensibly used for facial recognition or (less likely) visual effects. This is most likely one of the 2MP cameras, because why else would you have two 2MP cameras when one is usually able to provide enough depth data for fancy effects? In any event, all will become clear soon enough when Honor launches the device.

NEXT: New iPad Pro uses USB-C in lieu of Lightning — Here’s why that’s important

There are a lot of big phones out there, but which is right for you?

Let’s face it: big phones are here to stay. Samsung first made people want them with the original Galaxy Note, and we have not looked back since. Even companies like Apple, which stuck to smaller smartphones for years, eventually followed the trend with the iPhone 6 Plus in 2014.

There are now more options than ever when looking for a smartphone with a big displays — it’s easy to get overwhelmed. This is especially true right now, as the fall has brought a ton of new phones, many packing large screens.

Whether you are undecided or simply want a second opinion, here is our list of the best big phones available right now. 


Best all-around: Samsung Galaxy Note 9

Samsung Galaxy Note 9 is one of the best big phones you can buy

Want a big 6.3-inch AMOLED display and equally-large 4,000mAh battery? They’re here. Looking for at least 6GB of RAM and at least 128GB of expandable storage? Look no further. Hate notches? There isn’t one in sight. The Note 9 even comes with the series’ characteristic S Pen, which now adds tons of extra functionality via Bluetooth. The phone has no peer when it comes to its sheer number of features.

Why you should buy

  • The bright and large display is the best on the market,
  • If you can think of a software feature, it probably has it.
  • The S Pen brings features that no other phone has.

Why you might want to pass

  • The phone starts at $1,000.
  • Bixby continues to not be particularly good and its button cannot be officially remapped.
  • Based on precedent, software updates will be slow to arrive.

Learn more about the Galaxy Note 9


Best Galaxy Note 9 alternative: LG V40 ThinQ

LG V40 ThinQ in hand showing home screen

The story of the LG V40 ThinQ starts and ends with its five cameras — three around back and two up front — something no other phone’s done. Even though we were not very kind to the V40 ThinQ, the phone has potential options not seen in other phones.

Why you should buy

  • The phone can take regular, wide-angle, and telephoto shots.
  • The 32-bit Quad DAC pumps out great audio through the headphone jack.
  • The Google Assistant button is actually useful.

Why you might want to pass

  • The images do not live up to the hype.
  • The features do not justify its almost-$1,000 price tag.
  • Based on precedent, software updates will be extremely slow.

Learn more about the LG V40 ThinQ


Best big phone with stock Android: Google Pixel 3 XL

Pixel 3 XL - best big phone for stock fans

It might not have the bells and whistles of the Galaxy Note 9 and V40 ThinQ, but the Pixel 3 XL focuses on speed, ease of use, and being helpful. We didn’t call the Pixel 3 XL the Android iPhone for “the clicks” or lulz, but because it is the Android phone designed to appeal to everyone else. Its value is more than just specs on paper.

Why you should buy

  • The software is extremely fluid and gets updates directly from Google.
  • The single rear camera delivers an excellent and consistent photo-taking experience.
  • The learning curve is one of the smallest we have seen from an Android phone.

Why you might want to pass

  • You do not want to spend $899 on a smartphone.
  • Most of its headlining software features will trickle down to existing Pixels.
  • There is a lack of widespread availability.

Learn more about the Google Pixel 3 XL


Best big phone on the cheap: Honor 8X

It’s not as flashy as the Galaxy Note 9 or as fluid as the Pixel 3 XL, but the Honor 8X one of the best mid-tier smartphones and one of the best affordable big phones you can buy. This is a supersized phablet that comes in at under 300 euros (~$345), yet it delivers snappy performance and a stunning design. Look no further than the Honor 8X if you want a smartphone to make your wallet happy.

Why should you buy

  • The 3,750mAh battery has no problem surviving two days of use.
  • The premium design, performance, and storage options are a cut above your typical mid-tier smartphone.
  • You can buy four Honor 8Xs for the price of one Galaxy Note 9.

Why you might want to pass

  • The camera performance is hit or miss.
  • Dated hardware choices, such as a Micro-USB port and single bottom-firing speaker.
  • There is no IP rating.

Learn more about the Honor 8X


Best non-Android: iPhone XS Max

In any discussion of big phones, the iPhone XS Max is the elephant in the room. Notch haters will gravitate to the top, but everyone else will focus on the smooth performance, fantastic display, and great cameras. It may be cliche, but the iPhone XS Max is what happens when hardware and software meet in the middle as equals. Also, you really don’t have many other options for non-Android these days, with Windows Mobile pretty much dead.

Why you should buy

  • The A12 Bionic and iOS 12 optimizations deliver excellent performance.
  • The display rivals the Galaxy Note 9.
  • The phone slots in nicely with the rest of Apple’s ecosystem.

Why you might want to pass

  • The phone starts at $1,099.
  • The software does not make proper use of the large display.
  • Reports of phones not charging and antenna problems.

Learn more about the iPhone XS Max


We will continually update this list as manufacturers release more phones. You should also look out for the Huawei Mate 20 Pro and Mate 20 X, though we haven’t had enough time to fully review them. Perhaps one or both will make the list soon!

If you feel like we left something out or believe we nailed it, let us know in the comments below!

Honor 8X launches in India – looks like a million bucks, available for less than $250

In a press conference in New Delhi, Honor announced the launch of its latest smartphone, the Honor 8X, in India. Honor has released a number of smartphones in 2018 — perhaps too many – but most of these offer exceptional value and build quality that punches well above their price tag. The Honor 8X fits into that portfolio easily.

Quintessential Honor Smartphone

The Honor 8X looks like the quintessential Honor smartphone, featuring a glossy textured glass back finish with its dazzling light reflecting properties, metal trim, notched display, and eye-catching looks all around.

The Honor 8X sports a 6.5-inch LTPS LCD display with a 2340 x 1080 resolution, producing a density of 397 pixels per inch. The 91 percent screen-to-body ratio and minimal chin are undeniably impressive, giving the handset more screen to work.

The combination of metal and gradient glass looks and feels great and the Honor 8X rivals the design and aesthetics of premium flagship handsets which cost significantly more.

Mid-range Specifications

While the display and design aesthetics appear premium, the hardware specifications for the Honor 8X hover somewhere between mid- and low-end. The Honor 8X runs Android 8.1 Oreo skinned with EMUI 8.2 on top.

Editor’s Pick

On the processing side, there’s a distinctly mid-range Kirin 710 SoC, which offers powerful Cortex-A73 CPU cores but a lower end Mali-G51 GPU. The handset comes in three memory variants with combinations of 4GB or 6GB of RAM and 64GB or 128GB of internal storage.

The handset’s microUSB connector with USB 2.0 data speeds feels dated though. Fast charging capabilities are included, but we’re capped at 5V/2A.

  Honor 8X
Display 6.5 inches
2,340 x 1,080
19.5:9 notched display
91% screen-to-body ratio
Processor HiSilicon Kirin 710
Octa-Core (4 x Cortex-A73 2.2 GHz + 4 x Cortex-A53 1.7 GHz)
GPU Mali-G51 MP4
RAM 4GB or 6GB
Storage 64GB or 128GB
Battery 3,750mAh
Cameras Rear dual cameras:
20MP (f/1.8 aperture) + 2 MP

Single front camera:
16MP (f/2.0 aperture)

Software Android 8.1 Oreo
Skinned with EMUI 8.2
Connectivity WiFi 802.11 ac (2.4 and 5GHz)
Bluetooth 5
GPS
GLONASS
Network 900MHz, 1800MHz, 800MHz, 2GHz
Bands 38, 39, 40, 41 (2555-2575 MHZ, 2575-2635 MHZ, 2635-2655 MHZ)
Band 1, Band 3, 1.9 GHz, I, VIII
Ports microUSB
3.5mm headphone jack
SIM Dual nano SIM
Dimensions 160.4 x 76.6 x 7.8mm
Weight 175g
Colors Black, Blue, Red, Purple

AI Cameras

There’s a familiar looking dual camera setup on the back of the Honor 8X. The primary sensor offers 20-megapixels of resolution with a f/1.8 aperture and Phase Detection Auto Focus. The 2MP secondary camera is used entirely for depth calculation, enabling re-adjustable aperture and bokeh after taking the picture. The front-facing camera is a 16-megapixel affair with a f/2.0 aperture.

Honor’s big selling point with all of its recent phones are their AI camera capabilities. The Honor 8X recognizes 22 different scenarios in which it can apply custom exposure and color corrections.

Pricing and Availability

The Honor 8X is a super-sized phablet with a premium design that stands out in a crowd with mid-range specifications sheet and dated hardware choices.

The Honor 8X comes in in blue, black, and red color variants and will be available for purchase in India starting October 24, exclusively on Amazon.in. The customers can also purchase 8X from www.hihonor.com/in.

The 4GB + 64GB variant is priced at 14,999 rupees ($203), the 6GB + 64GB variant at 16,999 rupees ($231), while the top variant with 6GB + 128GB will set you back with 18,999 rupees ($258).

What do you think of Honor’s latest mid-range smartphone, and would you like to pick up the Honor 8X? Tell us in the comments!