Pocophone F1 international giveaway!

It’s time for the Sunday giveaway! Like every week, we’re giving away another a brand new Android phone to one lucky Android Authority reader.

A big congratulations to the winner of last week’s Honor View 20 giveaway, Ali B. from Netherlands.

This week we’re giving away a brand new Pocophone F1, brought to you by the Android Authority app!

If you’re looking for the best way to stay up to date with AndroidAuthority.com, look no further than the AA app for Android. Available for free in the Google Play Store, the official AA app is the fastest way to get all the latest news, rumors, tips and tricks, and device reviews on your mobile device.

It’s fast, looks good, and gives you breaking Android news at your fingertips — what more could you want?

Nowadays, you can spend upwards of $1,000 on a smartphone. Or you can pay about a third of that and get the Pocophone F1.

We’re not going to tell you this is the best phone on the market — it’s not. But for just $300, it offers many of the same specs that you’d normally only get with the highest-end phones. The Pocophone F1 comes with a Snapdragon 845 chipset, 6 or 8GB of RAM, up to 256GB of storage, and a big 4,000mAh battery.

Right now you shouldn’t care about the price, because we’re giving one away! For free! To learn more about the Pocophone F1, head to our related coverage below:

Enter the giveaway here

Pocophone F1 international giveaway!

Don’t miss: Jaybird Tarah giveaway

Winners gallery

Terms & conditions

  • This is an international giveaway (except when we can not ship to your country).
  • If we can not ship to your country, you will be compensated with an online gift card of equal MSRP value to the prize.
  • We are not responsible for lost shipments.
  • We are not responsible if your giveaway prize malfunctions.
  • You must be age of majority in your country of residence.
  • We are not responsible for any duties or import fees that you may incur.
  • Only one entry per person; please do not enter multiple email addresses. We will verify all winners and if we detect multiple email addresses by the same person you will not be eligible to win.
  • We reserve all rights to make any changes to this giveaway.
  • This giveaway is operated by Android Authority.
  • The prize will ship when it is available to purchase.

More: Android Authority international giveaway FAQs

Samsung’s flash sale takes $300 off the Galaxy Note 9 today only

The unlocked 128GB model is on sale through midnight EST.

Samsung is holding a flash sale on the unlocked Samsung Galaxy Note 9 device today, offering $300 off through midnight EST when you enter promo code SAMSUNG300 during checkout. That’ll bring its price down to $699.99, but only the 128GB models are eligible for this promotion; shipping is free. There is a limit of two devices per customer.

By trading in an eligible device, you can score a bonus of up to $350 off the price of the device instantly! That’s an extra $50 more than what Samsung usually offers for trade-ins. Once all is said and done, and traded in, you could be walking away with the new device for as low as $349.99.

The Galaxy Note 9 is equipped with a huge 6.4-inch Super AMOLED display and features IP68 water resistance. It comes with the S-Pen as well and sports a 4000mAh battery. Basically, the Note 9 is a powerhouse. It usually sells for $999.99 and has never been priced this low until today.

If you have any other questions regarding this device, our review and overview guide should help you find some answers.

See at Samsung

Ditch the nav bar on the latest Samsung phones with One UI

With OneUI and Android Pie, Samsung — like Google and OnePlus — is offering a gesture navigation system option to replace the traditional nav bar if you so choose. Unlike Google and OnePlus, Samsung’s version keeps the Recents “button” alongside Home and Back, and even has two modes to help you ease into your bar-less experience. Whether you want to try the new modes or just want to put your nav buttons back the way you want them, everything lives in one simple menu.

Samsung phones with OneUI

How to adjust your navigation settings in Samsung OneUI

  1. Open the Settings app (gear icon).
  2. Tap Display.
  3. Scroll down and tap Navigation bar.

  4. By default, if you hard-press where the home button normally is on the screen while the screen is off, the screen will wake. To adjust that sensitivity, tap Hard press Home button.
  5. To not skip your lock screen by hard pressing the home button, tap Unlock with Home button to toggle it off.
  6. Tap Full screen gestures to try out Samsung’s gesture navigation system.
  7. Scroll down and tap the Button order you prefer. Samsung traditionally has the nav bar set to [Recents, Home, Back] as opposed to the more normal [Back, Home, Recents] used by most manufacturers.

By default when you swap to full-screen gestures, you’ll still see three slim lines at the bottom of the bar, which help train your fingers as to where each of the nav gestures sit at the bottom of the screen. Once you’re sure you’re comfortable with the gestures, scroll to the bottom of the Navigation bar menu and tap Gesture hints to remove the three lines and give yourself a full-screen experience.

Our pick

Samsung Galaxy S9

$530 at Amazon

Get the latest Samsung navigation at reasonable prices

The Galaxy S10 is almost here, and that’s put the S9 on sale almost everywhere, even though it’s still a top-tier phone with a top-tier screen — without a hole punch in its top corner.

Deep discounts make this flagship even more affordable while still letting you try out Samsung’s new Android 9 Pie and One UI software. While this model is almost year old, it’s by no means outdated.

We asked, you told us: Playmojis are fun, but you don’t use them

Google Pixel 3 Love Playmoji

Augmented reality, much like virtual reality, never really took off the way that many believed it would. While some are using it in creative ways, most people aren’t walking around holding their smartphones in front of their faces, augmenting the world around them.

Despite this, Google continues to work on its AR Playground platform. For example, in just the last two weeks, the Silicon Valley company has released two new Playmoji packs.

So we decided to ask you, do you use Google’s Playmoji? Here’s what you had to say.

Do you use Playmoji?

Results

Unsurprisingly, 39 percent of those who participated in this week’s poll stated that they have never used Playmoji. Following that, 24 percent of the votes marked that they’ve used Playmoji once or twice and six percent said they use it all of the time.

As a Pixel owner, I can honestly say that I’ve used Playmoji when new AR packs were released, but I’ve never taken out my phone and dropped Iron Man into the scene because I thought it would enhance my photos. For me, the AR technology is fun to play with, but it isn’t something I would use once a day, week, or even month.

The sentiment towards Playmoji appears to remain unchanged for non-Pixel owners. While nine percent of the voters said they would use Google’s AR stickers, 22 percent said they wouldn’t.

As Google is rumored to be working to bring its AR Playground platform to other Android handsets, this statistic makes me believe the company’s efforts might be wasted.

Noteworthy comments

Here are some of the best comments from last week’s poll explaining why they voted the way that they did:

  • I showed it to my (young) son a couple of years ago with the Star Wars characters and that was that.
  • Basically it [Playmoji] is the new Google+ that is just gimmick, a pain to use, doesn’t solve any real problem and only creates a marginal entertainment value that hurts the battery more than anything else.
  • I really love the Childish Gambino pack!!! I use it sometimes when I remember BUT it uses a LOT OF BATTERY. It is fun and, sometimes, people feel surprise on how well it is implemented… BUT, you know, it is not useful at all (it’s more like a game that you play sometimes when you a bored)
  • My kids (5 & 3 yr old boys) love it.

That’s it for this week, everyone. As always, thanks for voting, thanks for the comments, and don’t forget to let us know what you thought of the results below.

Pride and Tribalism [#acpodcast]

Daniel Bader and Andrew Martonik are joined this week by Android Police managing editor David Ruddock! They discuss Amazon’s acquisition of mesh Wi-Fi company, Eero, and why David thinks 5G might be the death of some smartphone companies.

They also look at Samsung’s 10.5-inch Galaxy Tab S5e and rumors about several new Galaxy wearables. There are also rumors about Pixel Watch from Google and some not-so-great realities when it comes to the current state of Wear OS.

Rounding things out, the crew discuss the harm caused by clickbait tech sites that publish bad/fake rumors alongside “aggregated” articles from legitimate sources.

Listen now

  • Subscribe in Google Play Music: Audio
  • Subscribe in iTunes: Audio
  • Subscribe in RSS: Audio
  • Download directly: Audio

Show Notes and Links:

Sponsors:

  • Wix Creation without limits. Visit wix.com/podcast and get 10% Off Your Wix Premium Plan — enter the code WIXPROMO at checkout.
  • eero: Life’s too short for bad WiFi. Never think about WiFi again – To get $100 off the eero base unit with 2 beacons package, and 1 year of eero Plus, visit eero.com/acp and at checkout enter ACP.

Pride and Tribalism [#acpodcast]

Daniel Bader and Andrew Martonik are joined this week by Android Police managing editor David Ruddock! They discuss Amazon’s acquisition of mesh Wi-Fi company, Eero, and why David thinks 5G might be the death of some smartphone companies.

They also look at Samsung’s 10.5-inch Galaxy Tab S5e and rumors about several new Galaxy wearables. There are also rumors about Pixel Watch from Google and some not-so-great realities when it comes to the current state of Wear OS.

Rounding things out, the crew discuss the harm caused by clickbait tech sites that publish bad/fake rumors alongside “aggregated” articles from legitimate sources.

Listen now

  • Subscribe in Google Play Music: Audio
  • Subscribe in iTunes: Audio
  • Subscribe in RSS: Audio
  • Download directly: Audio

Show Notes and Links:

Sponsors:

  • Wix Creation without limits. Visit wix.com/podcast and get 10% Off Your Wix Premium Plan — enter the code WIXPROMO at checkout.
  • eero: Life’s too short for bad WiFi. Never think about WiFi again – To get $100 off the eero base unit with 2 beacons package, and 1 year of eero Plus, visit eero.com/acp and at checkout enter ACP.

Pride and Tribalism [#acpodcast]

Daniel Bader and Andrew Martonik are joined this week by Android Police managing editor David Ruddock! They discuss Amazon’s acquisition of mesh Wi-Fi company, Eero, and why David thinks 5G might be the death of some smartphone companies.

They also look at Samsung’s 10.5-inch Galaxy Tab S5e and rumors about several new Galaxy wearables. There are also rumors about Pixel Watch from Google and some not-so-great realities when it comes to the current state of Wear OS.

Rounding things out, the crew discuss the harm caused by clickbait tech sites that publish bad/fake rumors alongside “aggregated” articles from legitimate sources.

Listen now

  • Subscribe in Google Play Music: Audio
  • Subscribe in iTunes: Audio
  • Subscribe in RSS: Audio
  • Download directly: Audio

Show Notes and Links:

Sponsors:

  • Wix Creation without limits. Visit wix.com/podcast and get 10% Off Your Wix Premium Plan — enter the code WIXPROMO at checkout.
  • eero: Life’s too short for bad WiFi. Never think about WiFi again – To get $100 off the eero base unit with 2 beacons package, and 1 year of eero Plus, visit eero.com/acp and at checkout enter ACP.

Pride and Tribalism [#acpodcast]

Daniel Bader and Andrew Martonik are joined this week by Android Police managing editor David Ruddock! They discuss Amazon’s acquisition of mesh Wi-Fi company, Eero, and why David thinks 5G might be the death of some smartphone companies.

They also look at Samsung’s 10.5-inch Galaxy Tab S5e and rumors about several new Galaxy wearables. There are also rumors about Pixel Watch from Google and some not-so-great realities when it comes to the current state of Wear OS.

Rounding things out, the crew discuss the harm caused by clickbait tech sites that publish bad/fake rumors alongside “aggregated” articles from legitimate sources.

Listen now

  • Subscribe in Google Play Music: Audio
  • Subscribe in iTunes: Audio
  • Subscribe in RSS: Audio
  • Download directly: Audio

Show Notes and Links:

Sponsors:

  • Wix Creation without limits. Visit wix.com/podcast and get 10% Off Your Wix Premium Plan — enter the code WIXPROMO at checkout.
  • eero: Life’s too short for bad WiFi. Never think about WiFi again – To get $100 off the eero base unit with 2 beacons package, and 1 year of eero Plus, visit eero.com/acp and at checkout enter ACP.

Pride and Tribalism [#acpodcast]

Daniel Bader and Andrew Martonik are joined this week by Android Police managing editor David Ruddock! They discuss Amazon’s acquisition of mesh Wi-Fi company, Eero, and why David thinks 5G might be the death of some smartphone companies.

They also look at Samsung’s 10.5-inch Galaxy Tab S5e and rumors about several new Galaxy wearables. There are also rumors about Pixel Watch from Google and some not-so-great realities when it comes to the current state of Wear OS.

Rounding things out, the crew discuss the harm caused by clickbait tech sites that publish bad/fake rumors alongside “aggregated” articles from legitimate sources.

Listen now

  • Subscribe in Google Play Music: Audio
  • Subscribe in iTunes: Audio
  • Subscribe in RSS: Audio
  • Download directly: Audio

Show Notes and Links:

Sponsors:

  • Wix Creation without limits. Visit wix.com/podcast and get 10% Off Your Wix Premium Plan — enter the code WIXPROMO at checkout.
  • eero: Life’s too short for bad WiFi. Never think about WiFi again – To get $100 off the eero base unit with 2 beacons package, and 1 year of eero Plus, visit eero.com/acp and at checkout enter ACP.

Huawei MediaPad M5 Lite review: A solid competitor to Apple’s low-cost iPad

side of Huawei MediaPad M5 Lite

The Huawei MediaPad M5 Lite is a tablet the whole family can share. With multiple user profiles, parental controls, and eye-protection for kids, the M5 Lite aims to be the focal point of your home’s mobile entertainment center.

Editor’s Pick

Huawei is pitching the MediaPad M5 Lite as an ideal around-the-house companion. The hardware falls in line with Huawei’s current design language, just as the software does with the company’s EMUI concept. What’s particularly interesting are the additional tools Huawei is making available to parents, who can take greater control over their kids’ screen time.

Is this tablet a fit for your family? Let’s find out in our Huawei MediaPad M5 Lite review.

Handy hardware

Tablets are great for consuming media. The slate form factor capably bridges the divide between watching video on phones, which can be too small, and watching on laptops, which can be awkward. Kids often take to tablets naturally, as if the product category was conceived just for them. My daughter seized upon the M5 Lite and preferred it to her Chromebook for catching up on her favorite YouTube channels.

homescreen of Huawei MediaPad M5 Lite review unit

I find tablets with 7- or 8-inch screens to be ideal for portability and usability, but 10-inch screens are often more cinematic. The M5 Lite has a 10.1-inch screen with a 16:9 aspect ratio. This gives the tablet an oblong look compared to tablets that have a 4:3 screen. The Huawei MediaPad M5 Lite’s dimensions are on par with those of the $329 Apple iPad, meaning it is about the size and shape of a comic book.

This is no piece of Playskool plastic.

Despite aiming the Huawei MediaPad M5 Lite at younger users, the tablet is sculpted from fine materials. An attractive metal chassis forms the rear surface and side edges. Diamond-cut chamfers catch the light and the sand-blasted aluminum has a nice texture. The front panel is all glass, of course. The glass is fitted snugly into the chassis and boasts a rounded shape along the edges. The M5 Lite is not ruggedized, so a case may be in order to keep it safe(r) from clumsy hands. Huawei didn’t skimp on the design or the materials; this is no piece of Playskool plastic.

Huawei MediaPad M5 Lite front

The controls are a mix of good and bad. The buttons for waking the tablet and adjusting the volume are on the right side. My daughter thought they were easy to find and use. A tray on the left edge allows you to boost storage via microSD memory card or add a SIM card for cellular data.

The problem is the headphone jack.

First, let me say that I’m grateful that there is a headphone jack. Huawei’s pricier MediaPad M5 Pro doesn’t have one. Huawei put the jack on the M5 Lite’s left edge, all the way at the bottom. Any headphones you plug into the jack will stick out sideways and get in the way of your hand position as you try to hold the tablet. This location also makes the jack susceptible to damage from pressure. To make matters worse, the USB-C port is right next to headphone jack. I don’t think Huawei thought this through.

Huawei MediaPad 5 Lite corner with headphone jack and usb type-c jack

The screen is good, but not great. It has 1,920 by 1,200 pixels, which is Full HD. The pixel density comes in at 224ppi, which is well under the 264ppi offered by some competing tablets. This means the MediaPad M5 Lite’s display isn’t quite as sharp as I’d like it to be. The LCD panel puts out plenty of light for easy viewing in most conditions, like the couch or the back seat of a car. Color is not as accurate as it should be. The entire displays skews a bit cool, so whites often have a blue tint to them. This isn’t an issue when you’re watching videos; it’s more noticeable when browsing the web or using Google apps.

Silly software

Huawei cooked up some special stuff for families. An app called Kids Corner lets kids have their own space on the tablet, all while falling under the watchful eye of their parents.

Our Huawei MediaPad M5 Lite review unit runs Android 8 Oreo and is skinned with Huawei’s EMUI 8. EMUI is a pretty heavy-handed skin and can be annoying at times. The OS is capable and includes all features with which Android users should be familiar, such as multiple home screen panels, Google Feed, an app drawer, the quick settings shade, and so on. I like that Huawei allows you to pick from several different home screen styles.

screenshot showing Huawei MediaPad 5 Lite's homescreen

If you have kids aged 10 or up, I’d let them use the standard Android UI. They won’t like the Kids Corner mode, which is for younger tots.

Kids Corner is not just a setting, but an entirely separate mode of operation. As a parent, you’ll have to first set it up, complete with different profiles for different kids. You can control which apps kids are allowed to access, how long they’re allowed to use the tablet, when the blue light filter kicks on, and so on. Each kid can record his or her own fingerprint and instantly unlock it and go to their profile. Another tool helps parents prevent kids from holding the tablet too close to their eyes. It can be set to near, medium, or far. Depending on the setting, the M5 Lite will alert the viewer to back up a little if they get too close. This is meant to prevent strain on young and growing eyes.

Kids Corner sounds like Sesame Street.

Once the tablet has been put into Kids Corner mode, it cannot revert to standard mode without the parental PIN code. This means your kids can’t sneak out of Kids Corner and access other parts of the UI.

There’s one problem: Kids Corner sounds like “Sesame Street”. There’s a really annoying soundtrack playing in the background that’s all nursery-rhyme style. It definitely did not resonate with my daughter, who is 12. She complained it was for little kids.

Proficient performance

The Huawei MediaPad M5 Lite holds up well enough to daily use, but it’s obviously not a high-end machine.

Huawei selected its own Kirin 659 processor. This octa-core engine is supported by 3GB of memory. I wish it had 4GB. The tablet tended to get a bit warm after viewing video for about 30 minutes, though it never became uncomfortably hot. The Kirin 659 can handle basic media playback with no trouble at all. Music, movies, and books all loaded quickly and streamed smoothly over WiFi. It’s not as capable when it comes to games. Tetris won’t tax it, but high-quality racing games such as Asphalt will have the MediaPad M5 Lite begging for mercy.

Huawei MediaPad 5 Lite in natural light

I’m disappointed with the storage. It ships with just 32GB. The system consumes a full 13GB, leaving you with just 19GB for your stuff. This shouldn’t be much of a problem if you’re using the M5 Lite to stream content via WiFi at home, but it can become an issue if you plan to use the device offline, such as in the car or on an airplane. The good news is you can supplement the built-in storage with a microSD card up to 256GB.

Intense games will have the MediaPad M5 Lite begging for mercy.

Battery life is excellent. The tablet contains a 7,500mAh battery and it is good for more than 10 hours of video and gaming. The included charger can top up the battery fully in just under three hours.

Harman Kardon helped Huawei tune the four speakers. The M5 Lite delivers stereo and multi-dimensional sound with plenty of gusto. The speakers can be pushed pretty hard, though sound suffers from distortion at louder volumes. It leans a bit toward the treble-y side of things; it could use more bass.

rear view of Huawei MediaPad 5 Lite

The Bluetooth, WiFi, and GPS radios kept me connected with no problem.

The camera is good enough for grainy video chats and silly pix with the kids, but that’s about it.

Huawei MediaPad 5 Lite placed on art album

Final thoughts: Who is the Huawei MediaPad M5 Lite for?

Huawei created a compelling tablet for families in the MediaPad M5 Lite. It’s a well-crafted piece of hardware with only a few foibles. I wish the screen were just a bit better and the headphone jack were pushed to another part of the chassis. The Android 8 operating system and Huawei’s EMUI 8 ran smoothly and weren’t overly annoying. The kids’ software, while certainly powerful and enabling for parents, is aimed at very young kids and comes off as babyish. I wish Huawei had a Teen Corner in addition to Kids Corner.

The good battery life means the M5 Lite will run as long as your kids do, and, should it get lost under the couch for a week or two, still have some juice left.

Editor’s Pick

At $299 it’s a solid competitor to Apple’s $329 iPad. For Android families who want a capable machine for entertaining the household, the Huawei MediaPad M5 Lite is up to the task.

That concludes our Huawei MediaPad M5 Lite review. Will you buy this tablet?

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